Monthly Archives: May 2017

Learning City – at the Istana Open House May 2017

The showcase of makers went to the Istana for the second time during Labor day 2017. Afterall, there is no other appropriate day than labor day to showcase the makers and people involved in Making.

For labor day, Science Centre Singapore and the Life Long Learning Council curated a space together with makers from the community. the space meant to showcase how making is crucial to learning, the different aspects of making and how learning by making is a mindset to be cultivated from the very young age.

Made in Singapore:

With communities and makerspaces like the Ground Up Innovation Lab  and  Sustainable Living Lab  the stage is set for a strong ecosystem of learning through making. This has resulted in a network through which makers like Kee Wee can reach out their ideas and share best practices on how Singapore cab grow as a creator of technology and solutions.

18209352_1343982455697310_1066698189523207211_o

The ease of access of such techologies also allows any one to be a creator. Members from hackerspaceSG were on hand at the Istana to showcase and share DIY VR googles and open source robotics.

18238217_1343981785697377_4658226881733814534_o.jpg

Learning by making is not only limited to technology, At the Craft zone, artists Anjali and Priyanka helped lower the barrier of entry into making by getting children and visitors to work on paper quilling and glass mosaics

Participants at the build zone worked with everyday materials – straws and cardboard. Elda Webb and her team of facilitators guided visitors to make kites and other straw creations. To reinforce the idea of learning by making and also taking things apart, volunteers from Engineering Good shared how they took apart toys to build new interfaces for children with disabilities.

No one is really too young to start learning by Making. Sisters Sophia and Anjali Curic, 8 and 10, showcased this by putting together a space where parents and kids could engage in free form creativity using loose parts.

Everyone is a maker. Such creativity in young children can only be sustained through sustained opportunities in free play and tinkering. To reinforce this message in a collaboration between the Tinkeirng Studio at Science Centre and Imagin8ors, participants explored freely and extended their creativity to build marble machines out of every day materials.

Learning city was a collaboration between LifeLong Learning Council, Skills Future SG, Science Centre Singapore and President’s office, Istana. This programme was done in collaboration with local makers from Sustainable Living Lab, Ground Up innovation Labs, Kee Wee Teng, Hackerspace SG,  Anjali Venkat, Priyanka Gupta, Engineering Good, Elda Webb, Imagin8ors and Come and Make

Making Toys and Games 2017

Making Toys and Games is one of four parent child workshops that Science Centre offers in collaboration with local makers. This year, we worked together with makers Kee Wee Teng, Sebastian Ong, Seok Tin, Elda Webb, Anjali and Sophia Curic and Gabriel Perumal to put together a session where parents and kids could work together and learn by Making

Kee Wee (Kiwi) is a maker enthusiast, who aims to contribute to the fourth industrial revolution by increasing access to open source hardware and its possibilities. While parents and kids attending the programme had a chance to build trebuchets, Kiwi also shared with families his personal journey as a maker and the value of making in learning

IMG_0141

Annabel Tan is not new to the maker circle and also to the maker workshops that we do at Science Centre Singapore. She has charmed children and adults alike over the past years with her friendly manner and her polymer clay dolls. However, this time, it was not Annabel, but her son Sebastian who took the limelight, working with children and parents to make wire sculptures by bending, twirling and twisting wires. Sebastian’s station was complimented by Cultural medallion recipient Seok Tin Chng and Kim from iartSG, a social enterprise for artists with disabilities.

For us, it was also about creating an opportunity for parents and kids to learn from each other. A number of moms stepped in to teach their young children how to sew pieces of cloth together to make five stones.

We spoke to parents and children on their experience with the programme.

“When things werent working, we tried to troubleshoot first before asking for help. For instance, when our circuits failed because of bad contact in the copper tape, we tried to repair it”

“We learnt how to use our hands”